Best of 2017: Pretty Room Reveals and Practical DIY’s

I so enjoy creating this type of post each year.  It is so interesting and fulfilling to look back at the collection of blog posts from the past year and see what resonated most with my sweet readers.  It was a year of change here on the blog. I rebranded from Paper Daisy Design to Deeply Southern Home.  A change that is a better reflection of the tone and content, as well as a better description of my passions.  A blog round-up also tends to be a reflection of what is trending on Pinterest as many of my pageviews come directly from my followers there or from Pins that take on a life of their own.

In comparison to the Top 9 of Instagram, where pretty pictures prevail, on the blog Diy’s and tutorials are the top contenders.

If you don’t already, I would love to invite you to follow me on Instagram here.  I use Stories to give you a behind the scenes look and sometimes short informative tutorials too.

Now let’s get back to the list.

Top 10 Blog Posts of 2017

For each entry the title is a link to the original blog post. Feel free to read more by clicking the link.

1 Modern Plywood Daybed

I think the design is unique and the cost-effective nature of this build make it especially appealing. The simple tutorial reflects what DIY’ers are looking for – a functional, inexpensive way to make the most out of our homes. This post also is extremely popular on my new YouTube channel.

2 Peel & Stick Tile

This was an especially rewarding post to write.  This kitchen belongs to my step-sister whose home had flooded the previous year. I volunteered to help her add a glass tile backsplash and the finishing touches to her kitchen refresh. It was an easy project completed in a weekend.

3&5 Behind the Scenes of the Opulent Master Bathroom Makeover

Even though this renovation took place at the end of 2016 it wasn’t until the beginning of the year that I had an opportunity to go behind the scenes with readers and share some details about the process. I even give a video tour of the room in this post. Number 5 was a preceding post that updated the reveal with small changes.

4 Be Bold with Fearless Wallpaper

Removeable wallpaper has come a long way!  Hanging an accent wall of pattern in my studio makeover was a simple way to add interest and style without a long-term commitment.  Although honestly, I don’t see it coming down anytime soon. I really do love the drama it adds to the space without overpowering it.

6. Bohemian Jungle Studio Reveal: Spring One Room Challenge

This post reveals my Spring One Room Challenge makeover for my studio work space.  The room continues to bring me great joy and is a very inspirational place to work and create. The window side of the room is covered in plants, which for this self-proclaimed plant lady is a dream come true space.

I will add here one post I wish would have made it to the top 10 countdown, the Bed to Desk Tutorial. I am extremely proud of this unique DIY. Not only did the finished project come out better than I imagined, I LOVE my desk. See how I built this desk from parts of a poster bed here!!

7 Portable DIY Wooden Golf Ladder

This was a fun project created with my favorite blog sponsor, Ryobi Power Tools.  We look forward to many summers of fun with this project.

8 Naturally Fall Home Tour

 

In addition to being a seasonal look around my home with a fresh take on fall decor, this post was a sneak peek of the dining room before it became the Fall One Room Challenge. You can see that reveal post here.

9 Classic & Colorful Christmas Home Tour Part 1

In Part 1 of my Christmas Home Tour this year, I shared the kitchen and the media room.

This was the first Christmas to decorate our finished basement media room and I can’t wait to share more about this space this year. There are a number of DIY’s I’ve yet to fully share from down here.

10 Desk To Console Table

This was a fun woodworking makeover of an inexpensive desk by creating a parquet or Versaille pattern table top. The project does require a bit of patience but is certainly a doable project with the tutorial and tips I share in the post.

I want to take this opportunity to thank you for allowing me to share my home and my ideas with you. It is my deepest desire to inspire you to create a home you love without breaking the budget or compromising style. Every like, comment and visit to the blog is so greatly appreciated. I know I say those words occasionally but  maybe not often enough. Your support and friendship mean the world to me! Thank you!

I wish you every happiness and blessings for your home in 2018!!

 

The post Best of 2017: Pretty Room Reveals and Practical DIY’s appeared first on DeeplySouthernHome.

This Couple’s 43-Year-Long Love Story All Started in a Pen Pal Club

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When I joined an international pen pal club in November 1959, I had no idea how it would change my life. I was an RN at a large hospital in Bremen, in northern Germany. By December, the letters started pouring in. One letter from Sweden piqued my interest. It was from a Swedish horticulturist who lived and worked 
in Helsingborg. He wrote the letter in German, and soon many more of his letters crossed 
The Sound, or Oresund, and the Baltic Sea.

Around Easter in 1960, Nils wanted to meet. He arrived on Good Friday. On Saturday, we took a 12-mile hike in rainy April weather to Worpswede, a famous artist village in Lower Saxony, Germany. In the evening, we visited the world-renowned Ratskeller in Bremen, which housed Europe’s oldest wine barrel, dated 1653.

By this time, it was not only the wine that had warmed our hearts. Nils proposed, and we planned our wedding 
in Sweden for Midsommar (midsummer), 
a joyful annual holiday in Scandinavia in late June. Two days later, Nils flew back home, and 
I was left to plan the wedding by mastering piles of paperwork and fighting bureaucracy.

Now what? I did not speak Swedish and decided to cram in 10 hours of Berlitz language lessons a week before the wedding.

We drove to Helsingborg, where the marriage took place in a beautiful old kyrka (church) with Nils’ family and a few friends present. My father was still in East Germany, behind the Iron Curtain. To this day, I do not know what the pastor said, but according to the certificate, we were married!

At the end of 1962, we moved 
to Encinitas, California, to establish a flower business for 
a well-known Swedish grower. 
Nils built the business and eventually purchased it from his boss, changing from carnations 
to roses shipped around the U.S.

We became U.S. citizens and adopted two children. Nils and I did a lot of volunteer work in the community and received many awards.

Nils died at home in 2004 when he was 82. We had a blessed 43-year marriage after our Swedish/German courtship blitz.

The post This Couple’s 43-Year-Long Love Story All Started in a Pen Pal Club appeared first on Reader’s Digest.

The Best Natural Spas in Paris

Paris is a city known for its luxury. Looking for the Best Spas in Paris but concerned that the old school beauty treatments won’t use the best, cleanest, plant-based products? Never fear! Paris is a city that is constantly reinventing itself, and these five spas will not disappoint, no matter what your style or needs.

Hammam Pacha (For a Modern Take on Tradition)

Hammams are hugely popular in cosmopolitan Paris, a city as multifaceted as it is modern. A welcome glass of mint tea sets the tone at Hammam Pacha, one of the city’s most celebrated women-only Turkish-style hammam. After a shower with black soap, head to one of the expert attendants for a traditional scrub, then explore the different areas of this spacious spa: its graceful mosaic arches, its eucalytpus-scented hot steam room, its sauna and swimming pool, its vivacity-inducing cold showers.

Body treatments at Hammam Pacha include everything from seaweed wraps and massages with essential argan, rose, or orange flower blossom oils to a facial formulated with hibiscus that promises to treat stressed-out urban skin. Organic pastries and fruit juices are served in the peaceful resting room, afterward– before you’ve nodded off among the fluffy cushions, that is.

Hammam Pacha is located at 17 rue Mayet, 75006 Paris.

Arbre à Sens (For a Transformative Experience) 

There’s an away-from-it-all atmosphere at this outwardly unassuming spa, which is just steps from the buzzing rue Saint Honoré. Decorated with precious woods, fine mosaics, and Moroccan lanterns, Arbre à Sens reminisces of faraway lands. Treatments and massages for face and body borrow from spa rituals in Asia and North Africa, and the team uses only natural and botanical ingredients like rose petals, poppy seeds, rice grains, jasmine-laced milks. and infusions of Thai herbs. On a frigid afternoon, add on some time in the hammam and soak in the serenity.

Arbre à Sens is located at 4 rue Montesquieu, 75001 Paris. 

Le Tigre Yoga Club (A Trendy Oasis)

Le Tigre Yoga Club is a chic wellness centre that brings together yoga and pilates classes, massage studios, and a clean-cut café that specializes in vegan food. Book a house special massage, which is preceded by a short meditation session, or an ayurvedic massage (all treatments use Le Tigre’s custom mix of sweet almond, jojoba, and sesame oils, plus a dose of rooibos). Afterward, stay on site for a cold-pressed juice, a soothing cup of chai, or a heaping, feel-good bowl of quinoa topped with organic, seasonal veggies.

Le Tigre Yoga Club is located at 101 rue du Cherche-Midi, 75007 Paris. 

Mama Bali (A Tropical Getaway in The City)

The wanderlust of a Balinese holiday is the inspiration behind Mama Bali and its impressive selection of relaxing and energizing massages. The in-house line of French-made spa and beauty products are formulated with Indonesian blooms (including tuberose, lotus, and white gardenia) while ginger and lemongrass add spicy accents. Opt for a Javanese Lulur Scrub or a traditional Balinese massage using frangipani oil and drift off into exotically-scented reverie.   

Mama Bali is located at 8 rue Guillaume Bertrand, 75011 Paris. 

Spa Thémaé (A Centrally-Located Hot Spot)

Close to the Louvre but sheltered from the city-centre hubbub, Spa Thémaé is a modern wellness center that bases its operating philosophy on the benefits of antioxidant-rich tea. The independent French brand uses its own Thémaé products in its face and body treatments, the bulk of which include the spa’s proprietary mix of green, white, black, and oolong teas. The varied spa menu includes exfoliating tea or bamboo powder scrubs, whole-body massages that borrow from the Thai tradition, Indian and Hawaiian traditions, and mini add-ons like a green tea facial or a scalp massage in a warm bath.

Spa Thémaé is located at 20-22 rue Croix des Petits Champs, 75001 Paris. 

The post The Best Natural Spas in Paris appeared first on Garden Collage Magazine.

An Excerpt from Joanna Barsh’s “Grow Wherever You Work.”

BarshCoverEarlier this week, Joanna Barsh talked to the Amazon Book Review about her new book, Grow Wherever You Work: Straight Talk to Help With Your Toughest ChallengesThis latest book by Barsh, a longtime director of McKinsey & Company, uses real-life case studies from the work lives of more than 200 rising leaders to create a guide getting through the trickiest times in a career, from “When Work Holds No Passion” to “When Everything Sucks.” Intrigued? Below, we excerpt the introduction to Grow Wherever You Work, by kind permission of McGraw Hill.


An Excerpt from Grow Wherever You Work: Straight Talk to Help With Your Toughest Challenges:

Who knows when it began, but dirty water was bubbling up from the drain in the boiler room. Sometime around 11 p.m., Gaby and Nick returned home after a grueling day of work. They cautiously descended the stairs to the subbasement. Water was spreading everywhere. Gaby remembered, “I smelled it first. Then I saw the boxes storing important family papers sitting in water. I didn’t think. I took off my shoes and waded in. But the boxes were too heavy to move.”

She yelled at Nick to help. He refused, stiffly advising Gaby not to touch a thing (too late on that score) and to call the building manager. An exchange of criticisms began, rapidly followed by a few expletive-laden insults. In tears, Gaby dialed her mother. Nick retreated to safety upstairs to call his. Neither mother had much to add.

Panicked, Gaby called the building manager next. He did nothing to relieve her anxiety, replying that no, he wasn’t coming over to help and yes, it was most assuredly sewage water. In a tone that communicated I’m doing you a favor, he scheduled a plumber for the next day. Now Gaby had to rearrange her day to work from home, if her boss would even allow it. She had a sleepless night.

The next morning, she opened her door to Harris, an elderly plumber. A man of few words, he said, “I’ve done jobs like this for 30 years. This place will be as good as new.” Harris then moved the boxes with ease, whistling while he worked. And it was as good as new, for the time being.

The parallel to challenges at work is striking. The expression “volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous” (VUCA) describes extreme military situations, but it has since been adopted as the new normal by the business world. Your job could disappear without warning. Your boss could disappear without warning. People you work with live on the other side of the world—and they want to talk at 9 a.m. their time. Expectations are higher; your peers are working harder. And your work challenges are bigger and more intense than ever.

Challenges heighten anxiety and stress. Check. They deplete your energy. Double check. If not addressed, they cause harm in the long term. Triple check. Sound familiar?

Your work is filled with hard challenges that you don’t feel ready to handle. They may require difficult conversations, new skills, and tools you don’t yet have. Worse, their best friend is fear. Together, challenge and fear can sap your will and render you helpless.

But there’s another side to this story.

What if you grew more capable through challenges, working more productively and enjoyably? What if they helped you become more capable? You’d run toward challenges; you’d welcome them. With the right mindset, approaches, and tools, you’d find challenges intriguing and exciting. They’d engage you fully and stimulate your creative thinking.

Reframe. Challenges are not flashing danger signs, but spectacular opportunities to grow faster and smarter.

The challenges in this book come from research I’ve undertaken since 2015. I wanted to tailor my leadership work to midcareer professionals as a follow-up to the Centered Leadership Project, which I founded as a senior partner at McKinsey & Company. Consequently, for this book I interviewed over 200 high performing, high potential rising leaders at For- tune 1000 companies, in addition to startup founders, non-profit leaders, government executives, artists, actors, academics, journalists, teachers, and other independent thinkers outside of big business. The participants worked at 120 different companies, across industries and functions—and not the usual suspects! Their backgrounds are as varied as their professional lives. Almost 40 percent are people of color. Those born outside the United States or with immigrant parents represent over 40 countries. These remarkable  participants shared their personal and professional challenges openly and generously with me. Collectively,  they  contributed raw experiences from their work and lives.

You don’t have to love everyone in this book or want to be like them. Chances are, you’re going to dislike a few! I didn’t include their stories to win your sympathy or compassion but to share important insights that may help somebody—possibly you. By the way, because many of the people in this book have asked for anonymity, I’ve changed names and circumstances to honor the request. That said, every story is real. Unvarnished.

The collective voice in this book speaks a profound truth: you don’t grow despite challenges but because of them. These stories underscore five themes:

  • Preparation is half the Challenges are made more manageable when you’ve built the skills and know-how to address them. You don’t always have the luxury, but getting ready for challenges will be a critical factor in your success.
  • Asking questions will help Thinking is critical, but it’s not what you think. The participants underscore the importance of reflection, soul-searching, and dreaming. Asking questions—big ones and granular ones—is a practice you would do well to hard-wire into your daily life.
  • Talking is a good Talking to your boss, mentors and sponsors, colleagues, coworkers, friends, and contacts is productive when it helps you address the questions. Interaction generates new energy, which may be exactly what you need.
  • Intentionality is the Do Not Pass Go Until You Do This Lurking beneath your behaviors are mindsets and beliefs that may limit you. With self-awareness, you can choose to stay as you are—or change. As much as you might wish it, change doesn’t happen on its own. Consciously shift your mindset and your experience will improve, even if the outcome isn’t everything you wanted.
  • Taking small steps frees you to Small steps help you test your way through trial and error, reinforcing your new mindsets and behaviors. Small steps mitigate risk. Take enough of them and they add up.

You’ll read about 12 work challenges in 12 chapters. Here’s how each unfolds: I introduce the challenge briefly; then share a few more  true stories (each followed by my answer to the question “so what?”); and wrap up with recommended tools, practices, and actions. You participate too. You have your own perspective, and you decide what to implement. As one participant said, “I’ve had enough of school. I don’t want to be led by the nose. Let me reach my own conclusions.”  Right on.

Use the book as you like. You’ll experience all of these tough challenges at some point in your career, assuredly more than once. Read from the be- ginning or start with the most pressing challenge that you face right now.

Think of me as your mentor in a box, or “mentor in a book” more appropriately. I offer more than 30 years of experience helping companies address their strategic, operational, and organizational challenges. I know how to structure problems, analyze the data, reach conclusions, and develop recommendations. I know how to interview and listen intently. That’s what underlies the stories, their “so what’s,” and my counsel. I respect that you may develop your own game plan. Nothing would please me more. This book is for all curious minds open to taking on the toughest work challenges. I hope that’s you. I hope you experience work, grow quickly, and above all aspire to greatness. You’re reading this book for a reason.

If you’re early on in your career, work will be more adventure and less drag when you’re open to learning, delighted by challenge, and intentional. Put the tools, practices, approaches, and recommended actions to the test. Learn from the stories of people who faced challenges you haven’t yet experienced. But please don’t compare. You’ve got just as much on the ball as the professionals in this book.

If  you’re  midway through your career or further along, there’s no time like the present to apply the five themes: preparing, asking, talking, setting your intention, and acting in small steps. Your experiences, skills, and know-how will be godsends, but try to see with fresh eyes too. Remember that if you ask the same questions and do the same things, you’ll get the same outcomes. That’s not what you want.

Our world suffers a severe leadership deficit on every level. This gap isn’t going to close without your help. Choose where to make your mark. Get going.

And I promise, that’s the end of the purple prose for me. From here on in, it’ll be straight talk, tough love, and “just the facts!”


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This Man Used A Hidden Spy Camera To Take Secret Street Photos In The 1890s

Carl Størmer (1872-1957) enjoyed a hobby that was very, very unusual at the time. He walked around Oslo, Norway in the 1890s with his spy camera and secretly took everyday pictures of people. The subjects in Størmer’s pictures appear in their natural state. It extremely differs from the grave and strict posing trends that dominated in photography during those years.

Carl got his C.P. Stirn Concealed Vest Spy Camera in 1893 when he was studying mathematics at the Royal Frederick University (now, University of Oslo). “It was a round flat canister hidden under the vest with the lens sticking out through a buttonhole,” he told St. Hallvard Journal from in 1942. “Under my clothes I had a string down through a hole in my trouser pocket, and when I pulled the string the camera took a photo.”

Norway’s first paparazzi usually photographed people at the exact time they were greeting him on the street. “I strolled down Carl Johan, found me a victim, greeted, got a gentle smile and pulled. Six images at a time and then I went home to switch [the] plate.” In total, Størmer took a total of about 500 secret images.

His candid photos aside, Størmer was also fascinated with science. He was a mathematician and physicist, known both for his work in number theory and studying the Northern Lights (Aurora Borealis).

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Make a Rhinestone Cocktail Ring

Etsy.com handmade and vintage goods

Photo by The Crafted Life

Whether you’re getting dressed for a formal event or jazzing up your daytime look for after-work drinks, an eye-catching cocktail ring can tie everything together. And while there are a lot of unique rings on Etsy, if you’re feeling creative, you can break out your jewelry-making supplies and make one yourself.

The process to make these rings is just the right mix of easy and fun, and the best part is that it only takes about 30 minutes to complete (plus drying time).

Ready to make your own? I’ll show you how.

At a glance

Time: 30 minues

Difficulty: Beginner

You will need:

Step 1: Plan your design


Before gluing anything in place, it helps to arrange a mock version of your ring on a tabletop. Play around with the rhinestones until you get the desired configuration.

Step 2: Glue rhinestone clusters onto felt


Cut a small square of felt and glue your rhinestones in place. You’ll want to start by gluing the backs down and then move to the sides of the rhinestones that touch one another. A bamboo skewer will help you get a dab of glue into those small, hard-to-reach places.

Step 3: Trim excess felt

Once the glue has dried, use scissors to cut off the excess felt. The sharper and smaller the scissors, the better.

Step 4: Attach rhinestones to ring

Glue the ring back to the center of the felt holding the rhinestones and let dry.

Just like that, you’re ready for happy hour!

All photographs by The Crafted Life.

Shop jewelry supplies

Rachel Mae Smith loves do­able DIYS and strives to make crafting easy, colorful and fun over on her blog, The Crafted Life. Her work has been featured in Martha Stewart Living, Better Homes and Garden, The Huffington Post, and more. When she’s not on Pinterest, or brushing glitter out of her hair, you can find her exploring and Instagramming in Philadelphia, PA.

The post Make a Rhinestone Cocktail Ring appeared first on Etsy Journal.

Bentley Bentayga: 5 Things You Need To Know

Bentley Bentayga

The Bentley Bentayga is faster than any other SUVs in the market

The Bentley Bentayga comes fitted with a double turbocharged engine with a capacity of 6.0 liters. The W12 behemoth engines is so powerful that it can produce up to 600 horsepower and torque power of 663 foot-pound. This powerful engine renders more powerful than other SUVs in the market. The Bentayga is fitted with an eight speed transmission that transmits power generated to all of its four wheels. With this power transmission, it can reach a leap from 0-60 mph in less than 4.5 seconds. The top speed of this car is 187 mph.

With the technology involved in the production, a Bentley Bentayga is costly

With the powerful performances exhibited and the luxurious assortments that accompany the car come with a price. Bentley Bentayga has a price tag of $230,000 making it the most expensive SUV in the world. It is $70,000 more than the most expensive Porsche Cayenne. The luxurious a assortments that come with it raise the price significantly. When all the additional assortments are included, the price of the SUV will shoot to almost a half a million dollars.

Bentley For Sale | Bentley Bentayga For Sale

Bentley Bentayga Interior

The Interior of the car is inspired with the technological advancement

Bentley Bentayga is fitted with all forms of technology developed in locomotive industry. It offers electric active control as an option for drawing power from its electric system of 48v. The roll bar is for giving ride comfort and body control balance. This will automatically bring the needed handling stability to the cabin. In terms of entertainment, every seat is fitted with a 10.2 inch tablets that are removable and can to the WiFi and mobile provided 4G networks. The android tablets are the forms of entertainment to the people aboard. Sound is enhanced by the fitted Naim sound system.

The world’s most expensive car watches is inbuilt in the new Bentley Bentayga

The SUV is fitted with the Mulliner Tourbillion Clock that is produced by Creitling. This clock goes for the market value of $234,000 US dollars. This is as part of the option list that most expensive cars come with. This extra list content has been broken by the contents of this Bentley. The price of the clock is justified by the manufacturer by stating that, Mulliner Tourbillion Clock is the most complicated clock ever made.

Bentley Bentayga Watch

Inspiration of the name comes from Mother Nature and the founder

The name of this SUV originates from the Taiga snow forest that covers the northern part of the world. The naming is also attached to the Roque Bentayga. This is a form of rock that is mainly found in an island in Spain called Gran Canaria. The name therefore is intended to evoke the natural beauty of mother earth given by its off-road capability. The owner believes that the name reflects the company’s believe on the capability of the car. The exceptional performances of this car take the experiences to another level of exotic environment associated with the inspiration the name is derived from

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