Zav Architects designs Iranian house as a belvedere featuring open-air viewing platforms

Tehran studio Zav Architects designed this boxy house in northern Iran as a series of enclosed living units surrounded by open-air platforms and social spaces with views across the rural landscape.

Villa Cheshm Cheran by ZAV Architects

The property is located in the hills outside of the city of Minudasht in Iran’s Golestan Province, and occupies a built area of 298 square metres on a site of around half an acre.

Villa Cheshm Cheran by ZAV Architects

Zav Architects was tasked with developing a proposal in response to the site’s natural topography and to enhance, rather than detract from, its rural context.

Villa Cheshm Cheran by ZAV Architects

The project’s main focus was to make the most of the expansive views. This prompted the studio to adopt a novel approach to laying out the building’s plan, and led to it naming the project Chesm Cheran, which means belvedere.

Villa Cheshm Cheran by ZAV Architects

“To secure maximum connection with nature, the conventional circulation and spatial diagram for rural and suburban constructions is challenged,” said Zav Architects.

“Circulation and social spaces of the house are combined and misplaced to be situated around the habitation units as an elevated open space called the Platform or Joy Lounge, which was the result of our endeavour to impose the minimum intervention on the farm land that appears as a duplicated and elevated piece of land.”

Villa Cheshm Cheran by ZAV Architects

Gaps between the floor slabs on each level create panoramic vistas from a series of interior and covered exterior spaces, particularly on two opposite corners where the lack of a supporting structure provides uninterrupted views.

The ground floor contains a large gym with separate changing rooms for men and women, as well as a mechanical room servicing the house.

Villa Cheshm Cheran by ZAV Architects

Robust stone walls on this level are interrupted by large windows that look out onto an adjacent tennis court and a terrace sheltered beneath the expansive slab of the floor above.

Villa Cheshm Cheran by ZAV Architects

The massive concrete slab forms a platform that functions as a large outdoor deck. The perimeter of this outdoor space provides external circulation linked directly to the nearby swimming pool and open-air barbecue pavilion.

The platform is partly occupied by three bedrooms, which are staggered in plan so doorways in the side of each room open straight onto the deck.

Villa Cheshm Cheran by ZAV Architects

To one side of the main building, a void allows light and views down to the lower level, while a tree growing up through another hole in the surface provides dappled shade.

A staircase between the bedroom units ascends through a void to the top floor, where it connects with a sheltered deck occupying almost half of this level.

Villa Cheshm Cheran by ZAV Architects

A door at the top of the stairs leads into an open-plan room accommodating living, dining and kitchen functions.

Villa Cheshm Cheran by ZAV Architects

Large windows lining this space ensure it feels as connected with the surrounding landscape as the adjoining terrace.

Villa Cheshm Cheran by ZAV Architects

The project was constructed using stone that facilitated the reopening of a local mine and led to the employment of 30 local labourers and a master builder.

Stone steps that tumble down from the living platform towards a central plaza follow the original slope of the site.

Villa Cheshm Cheran by ZAV Architects

The house and large barbecue pavilion are finished in a render that is left exposed internally as well as externally. Consistent flooring surfaces help to reinforce the connection between indoor and outdoor spaces.

The post Zav Architects designs Iranian house as a belvedere featuring open-air viewing platforms appeared first on Dezeen.

// house / Time Architects


© Quang Trần

© Quang Trần
  • Model: Trình Phương Quyền, Vũ Quốc Hiếu.
  • Design Studio: Time Architects
  • Construction Unit: Time Architects; Kakale Corp
  • Wood Furniture: Hoàng Phong Furniture
  • Lightning Equipment: Tân Mỹ Á
  • Alu & Glass Supply: Đông Phương Alu&Glass

© Chimnon Studio

© Chimnon Studio

Text description provided by the architects. I believe in God. Only I spell it Nature. -Frank Lloyd Wright-

The family members are all Christians. To them, belief is the most important. They want this new house to be modern, on the other hand, it must contain tradition.


© Quang Trần

© Quang Trần

Studying the context and the Investor life, the quest for the architects is to find “God” in “Nature” and bring Him to form, in Nature: Light, Wind, The Green,…


Section Diagram

Section Diagram

Inspired by the space order of the traditional house, with patios, intermediate spaces, louvre doors … are “transformed” to a “Cover”, fitting the needs of living.  The “soft-cover”, takes the role as an in-out environment filter as well as  enhancing the interactions between homeowners and neighbors.  The voids in the house are the “storage” for future “changes”. The separating-wood floors are used instead of the concrete, solid floors. Through the voids, Nature, in form of lights and winds, spreads throughout the house. Wherever the place in this house, people can feel Nature surrounding them, changing as time goes by.


© Quang Trần

© Quang Trần

With this, the bonds, the connections, the communications between people are strengthened.


© Quang Trần

© Quang Trần

Architecturally-Inspired Self-Portraits by Photography Duo Daniel Rueda and Anna Devís

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Self-taught photographers Daniel Rueda and Anna Devís play out their love affair with architecture on their Instagrams @drcuerda and @anniset, posing each other amongst unique geometric elements found in buildings across Europe. The pair are both architects by trade, and met while studying at university.

“Before starting at university I used to draw everything that came into my mind,” Devís explained in a video made by Adorama. “That process was very long so I decided to change the way to express them. That’s why I came into photography. It was quicker and it also made me happy.”

Their work started off with playful photoshoots that transformed into “creativity-driven minimalistic architectural self-portraits,” which is how they classify their playful photography.

“Neither of us can hide that it is us that we both love to take pictures of the most because we appear in each others’ pictures,” Rueda told Adorama. “I think the background is sometimes even more important that the main subject in the picture, that is why buildings and architecture are so important for my photography.”

You can watch a behind-the-scenes look into the couple’s artistic process in an interview with them in this video by Adorama.

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

 

Fumihiko Maki–designed Design Society Opens in Shenzhen

Shenzhen Design Society

Courtesy ©Design Society

China’s first major design complex marks the accelerating transformation of Shekou, an area at the southern tip of the nascent design city Shenzhen, from heavy-industry powerhouse into cultural hub.

Backed by the state-owned China Merchants Group in collaboration with the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in London, the Fumihiko Maki–designed Design Society is intended to be a “social space” for the local community and design professionals from the region and abroad.

The project also highlights a move away from what Chinese president Xi Jinping calls “weird architecture”: The complex is a relatively low-slung Modernist form, hunkered down between neighboring high-rise towers. “I didn’t want to use the iconic form of architecture that is very popular today,” explains the 89-year-old Pritzker-winning Japanese architect. “I think it is very important to always consider the ordinary people, not just architects.”

His objective was to go beyond a traditional repository of objects and Architecture House of Design encourage a wide range of activities. It seems to have succeeded for the Shenzheners lounging on the cascade of steps flanking two sides of the building and leading to a rooftop garden. Three striking cantilevered volumes also serve to maximize sea, city, and mountain views.

Inside, the meandering path through three cavernous atria avoids a shopping mall feel, Maki says, although 167,185 square feet of the 764,237-square-foot total floor space spread over six floors have been set aside for retail use.

There are six galleries of varying sizes, including a Sam Jacob Studio–designed space reserved for the V&A—an official collaborator until 2020—currently showing an inaugural exhibition of 250 design objects from the British institution’s collection. Another presentation space, the Park View Gallery, is exhibiting a retrospective of Maki’s career, including sketches and models of the initial building concept.

“Design Society is not only a place. Its name is also an appeal,” notes founding director Ole Bouman. “The duality between the name Design Society as a noun and verb is important to become more creative and allow creatives, who have already embraced creativity, to be inspired.”

You may also enjoy “At Princeton, Steven Holl Juggles Well-Tested Formulas and Experimentation.”

Categories: Architecture, Cultural Architecture, Design

The post Fumihiko Maki–designed Design Society Opens in Shenzhen appeared first on Metropolis.

Artist Philip Beesley Merges Chemistry, Artificial Intelligence, And Interactivity To Create “Living” Architecture

Multidisciplinary artist and architect Philip Beesley weaves together such a broad array of technologies and systems in his artworks that they legitimately defy description, but the immediate impact of encountering these sprawling interactive installations is visceral and awe-inspiring. His latest work, Astrocyte, connects chemistry, artificial intelligence, and an immersive soundscape to create a living piece of architecture that responds to the presence of viewers.

The piece further incorporates 3D-printed lighting components and masses of custom glasswork that contain a combination of oil, inorganic chemicals, and other solutions to form a sort of chemical skin. At the core of Beesley research is the question of whether architecture can truly be “alive,” opening the possibility for self-repairing structures or deeply responsive organic environments, where artificial intelligence exists at almost every level of design. Regardless of the complexity and heady ideas, the works are deeply aesthetically intriguing, something directly out of science fiction.

More info: Philip Beesley, Instagram, Flickr, Vimeo (h/t: colossal)































The post Artist Philip Beesley Merges Chemistry, Artificial Intelligence, And Interactivity To Create “Living” Architecture appeared first on Design You Trust.

This Airbnb in the South of France Comes with a 91-Foot Aquarium Pool

villa on the rocks france with aquarium pool 4 This Airbnb in the South of France Comes with a 91 Foot Aquarium Pool

 

Situated on the southern tip of France, you will find the amazing Villa on the Rocks rental property located in Bandol, a small commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur.

Designed by architect Rudy Ricciotti (who designed the Mucem Museum in Marseille), the 5 bedroom/8 bed/3 bathroom villa boasts an incredible 91-ft long lap pool that can be viewed from the inside and outside thanks to some extra thick, aquarium-style windows.

Close to the sea and surrounded by vineyards, Villa on the Rocks looks pretty memorable for a vacation rental. You can find a video tour and additional photos of the home below.

For more information check out the Airbnb listing.

 

 

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Photographers of Modernist Buildings Give a Face to the Tenants Who Live in Them

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Za Żelazną Bramą Estate, Warsaw 2014.

Based in Poland, Zupagrafika is a creative publisher and design studio run by Hispanic-Polish duo, David Navarro and Martyna Sobecka. Since 2012, Zupagrafika have published award-winning “build your own” architectural books showcasing their favorite Modernist and Brutalist buildings from the former Eastern Bloc and beyond. For half a decade, the design duo have been working on a photo series—titled The Tenants—which documents inhabitants outside of their post-war Modernist estates, proudly holding miniature, illustrated paper models of their buildings.

The pair traveled to various housing estates—in locations including Berlin, Chisinau, Halle Neustadt, Katowice, London, Paris, Poznan, Rostock, St. Petersburg, Wroclaw, and Warsaw. The subjects were asked to stand in front of their building and hold a miniature paper version, complete with finite details such as tiny windows, satellite dishes, and graffiti tags. In some cases, the portraits were taken at a time when the residents were unclear about the future of their homes due to demolition plans. “They will eventually make us move out…I’m not afraid of changes, I just hope I can afford them,” says Shamim, who lived on the third floor of Robin Hood Gardens, an iconic Brutalist building in London. Sadly, today the building no longer stands.

Other images capture dwellers who have lived in the same building for most of their life, and still reside there to this day, such as Eduardo, who has lived in Paris’ Orgues de Flandre high-rise building for the past 30 years. He says he wouldn’t move to any other flat in the city, even though “the neighborhood changed considerably in the ‘90s and isn’t that safe anymore” and “the new neighbors are sometimes noisy after 10 p.m.” Another example is Wiesław, from the star-shaped Gwiazdy estate in Poland who still remembers the first day he entered his new home in late ‘70s. As soon as he saw the panorama of Katowice city from his top floor flat he knew it was home. “I will never forget this view, we had all the facilities, it felt so modern,” he said.

Discover more of Zupagrafika’s work on the website, where you can also purchase the DIY paper model kits from their collection.

The Tenants photo series by Zupagrafika documents inhabitants outside of their post-war, Modernist estates, proudly holding miniature, illustrated paper models of their buildings.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

St Petersburg. Novosmoloenskaya Housing Complex 2017.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Chisinau. “romanița” Collective Housing Tower 2017.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Tarchomin Estate, Warsaw 2013. Currently under thermo-modernization.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Gwiazdy Estate, Katowice 2015.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Superjednostka, Katowice 2015.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Orgues De Flandre, Paris 2016.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Ledbury Estate, London 2015.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Terrassenhaus, Schmarl Housing Estate. errassenhaus, Rostock 2017.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Hochhaus Ernst-Thälmann-Park, Berlin 2017.

In some cases, the portraits were taken at a time when the residents were unclear about the future of their homes due to demolition plans.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

“Manhattan” Housing Complex, Wroclaw 2017. Recently Refurbished.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Rotunda Pko, Warsaw. 2014. Demolished.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Aylesbury Estate, London 2014. Currently under demolition.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Cité Curial-michelet, Paris 2016. Recently Refurbished.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Robin Hood Gardens, London 2015. Currently under demolition.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Osiedle Orła Białego, Poznan 2012. Currently under thermo-modernization.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Balfron Tower, London 2015.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Odrodzenia Estate, Katowice 2015. Currently under thermo-modernization.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Les Choux De Créteil, Paris 2016.

The Tenants Paper Architecture Model Photo Series by Zupagrafika

Hochhaus-Scheiben, Halle Neustadt 2017.

Zupagrafika: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Behance

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Zupagrafika.

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The post Photographers of Modernist Buildings Give a Face to the Tenants Who Live in Them appeared first on My Modern Met.

This Genius Foldable House Takes Only 6 Hours To Build And Costs Only $33K

In a time when real estate prices are going through the roof, Italian Renato Vidal has created a brilliant alternative to traditional housing. The M.A.Di. is a flat pack folding home that costs only $33K and three people can assemble it in any flat location in about 6 hours.

The building is certified as seismically safe and created with high-quality material. It comes in a variety of sizes, ranging from a 290-square-foot home for $33K to a 904-square-foot design for $73K. All basic models include a bathroom with sanitary facilities, kitchen connections, one stage staircase and technical installations.

Once on site, M.A.Di. can even be constructed without a concrete foundation. The structures can be assembled to go completely off-grid with the addition of solar panels, grey water systems, and LED lighting. “It creates cosy and safe places highly customizable according to your needs,” its website writes. Delivery time takes up to 60 days after the acceptance of the final drawings.

More info: madihome.com

M.A.Di. looks like an ordinary house, but everything underneath the exterior is the complete opposite of “simple”

It is a flat pack folding home that costs only $33K and three people can assemble it in any flat location in about 6 hours

The home doesn’t have to be built on a concrete foundation, allowing the structure to have zero impact on the environment

Here’s a time-lapse of its assembly

And this is how the structure looks when completed

The interior has a sleek and modern open-plan style

And the 290-square-foot home can be customized to grow to a 904-square-foot design