Tosan Tajhiz Factory / L.E.D Architects


© Hamoon Moghaddam – Hamoon Digital Cinema

© Hamoon Moghaddam – Hamoon Digital Cinema
  • Architects: L.E.D Architects
  • Location: Tehran Province, 20th km of Damavand Road, Iran
  • Lead Architect: Shahab Mirzaean, Ehsan Naderi
  • Team: Mohammad Ebrahim Tajik, Omid Mohammadi, Hosein Zeinaghaji, Kasra shafieezadeh, Nahal Hamidi, Kaveh Khajuee
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Hamoon Moghaddam – Hamoon Digital Cinema
  • Consultants: Yaghob Abedpour, Mohammad Bozorgnia, Behzad Abdi
  • Contractor: Reza Asadi
  • Clients: Tosan Tajhiz co.

© Hamoon Moghaddam – Hamoon Digital Cinema

© Hamoon Moghaddam – Hamoon Digital Cinema

From the architect. Tosan Tajhiz Company’s activities in the field of design and production of medical equipment cleaning and disinfection to be launched from 1998. After years of activity, the company decides to enlarge. The 500 sqm Area assign to new factory and office in Pardis Technology Park.

The First challenge faced by designers was the existing foundation which restricted the height levels of underground levels. Due to the special rules of Pardis park, two levels underground and three levels above should be designed to meet the company need. The existing foundation should be considered as the lowest level and new foundation should be designed and built on the old one.


© Hamoon Moghaddam – Hamoon Digital Cinema

© Hamoon Moghaddam – Hamoon Digital Cinema

Program: According to the physical program, the -2 floor was assigned to the warehouse, dining room, prayer room, guard room, facilities and dressing room for the production employees. -1 floor was allocated to parking, ground floor to production and first and second floors to the Showroom, administrative and engineering rooms and the manager.


Section

Section

Transparency: producing of specific and Hi-technology products, the display of the manufacturing process could have created a specific visual value for the building. In addition, the showroom could have been completely seen by observers, and the building would be representative of all activities of the company. On the other hand, the dense of the adjoining buildings in Pardis Technology Park was not desirable for designers. The more transparent building make more visual space between the adjoining buildings.


© Hamoon Moghaddam – Hamoon Digital Cinema

© Hamoon Moghaddam – Hamoon Digital Cinema

Limited Height – Layout of Functions: The client had limited time to build, and due to the time and cost of destruction, the existing foundation should be maintained. Due to the height limitations based on park rules (10 and a half meters) and compulsory restriction of underground due to the existing foundation, different spaces are based on the height requirement, importance, and area of use.


© Hamoon Moghaddam – Hamoon Digital Cinema

© Hamoon Moghaddam – Hamoon Digital Cinema

Voids – construction Area permitted:: For the provision of permitted Area, multiple voids were considered to have different views from different spaces at different levels. Manager room at the highest level sees all the different spaces. Also, to fulfill required high height for the Production sector, the void was considered above the sector. On the other hand, these voids in combination with the showroom as an open space on the middle level formed an empty movement in the volume. Besides, the location of the voids in a different position of the plan has created a variety of internal views.


Voids Diagram Axonometrics

Voids Diagram Axonometrics

Façade as section: the building was considered to be maximally related to the surroundings so that the building was developed from inside and tuned from a section. The transparent facade was only intended to display the Extension of the interior. Voids in connection with the open showroom at the mid-level excavate the mass and the section of the building represent in transparent façade. Finally, vertical louvers are considered for controlling light in the production sector. The reason for not choosing the horizontal louver was due to the large excavation.


© Hamoon Moghaddam – Hamoon Digital Cinema

© Hamoon Moghaddam – Hamoon Digital Cinema

This Virtual Library Card Grants Free Access to 2,000+ Architecture Books

Internet Archive Virtual Library of Architecture Books

The story of architecture‘ by Jonathan Glancey

Many of us remember a time when getting your first library card was a rite of passage. Stepping into the library, filling out some details, and getting your card stamped for the first time signaled entry into the world of learning. Now, as time marches on, brick and mortar libraries are giving way to virtual collections, where borrowers can download and read texts online or via e-readers.

So what do these changes call for? A virtual library card. And the best place to sign up for one is the Internet Archive, a huge virtual library filled with text, audio, video, and photography. Much of its collection is open source downloads, such as the Guggenheim’s collection of modern art books or early 20th century 78rpm record recordings, but some texts are available exclusively for lending. This is where the library card comes in.

Simply sign up for free and you’ll be able to borrow up to 5 books at a time for a period of two weeks. Books can be read in a browser or downloaded as a PDF or EPUB version to read on your device using Adobe Digital Editions, which is available for free download. If the book you’re interested in is currently checked out, simply click a button to be put on a waitlist.

As lovers of all styles of architecture, we’re especially thrilled with its compendium of more than 2,000 architectural books available for lending. Many rare and out of print titles are included in the collection, allowing you to read up on historical and modern architectural styles from around the world. Here is a glance at some of our favorite titles. Get searching and brush up on your knowledge of Frank Lloyd Wright, Walter Gropius, and others who have shaped our world.

Now you can borrow over 2,000 architecture books for free at the Internet Archive.

Internet Archive Virtual Library of Architecture Books

Art nouveau architecture‘ edited by Frank Russell

Internet Archive Virtual Library of Architecture Books

Frank Lloyd Wright : force of nature‘ by Eric Peter Nash

Internet Archive Virtual Library of Architecture Books

The new architecture and the Bauhaus‘ by Walter Gropius

Internet Archive Virtual Library of free Architecture Books

Great Modern Architecture‘ by Sherban Cantacuzino

h/t: [Archdaily]

Related Articles:

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Over 100 Museums Invite You to “Color Their Collections” with Free Adult Coloring Books

The post This Virtual Library Card Grants Free Access to 2,000+ Architecture Books appeared first on My Modern Met.

An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

 
An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes
In an ongoing series entitled ‘Pipes‘, Munich-based photographer Robert Götzfried documents the beautiful and diverse designs of organ pipes. On Behance, Götzfried adds:

 

“For me it is the most amazing experience to shoot these places. I go there when nobody is around. You can still smell the incense in the air, you kind of still hear the bombastic sound of the organ but it’s all quiet. Every step echoes and you automatically get very calm yourself. Every little sound feels like eternal noise. Can you feel the silence? I shot these organs in Southern Germany, Bavaria. Most of them are placed in catholic churches.”

 

Götzfried has shared about 36 photos of organ pipes in two albums entitled Pipes and Pipes II. You can find some of our favourites below but be sure to see more of his work at the links listed as you will find many more fascinating photo projects.

 

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

 

pipes by robert gotzfried 8 An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

pipes by robert gotzfried 10 An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

pipes by robert gotzfried 7 An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

pipes by robert gotzfried 15 An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

pipes by robert gotzfried 5 An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

pipes by robert gotzfried 2 An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

pipes by robert gotzfried 4 An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

pipes by robert gotzfried 13 An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

pipes by robert gotzfried 11 An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

pipes by robert gotzfried 12 An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

pipes by robert gotzfried 3 An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

pipes by robert gotzfried 14 An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

pipes by robert gotzfried 9 An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

pipes by robert gotzfried 6 An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

pipes by robert gotzfried 1 An Ongoing Photo Series Dedicated to the Beautiful Designs of Organ Pipes

Robert Götzfried
Website | Facebook | Behance | Instagram

 

A Half Century of Bowling Alley Design in Southern Germany Captured by Robert Götzfried

German photographer Robert Götzfried (previously) seeks out unique architecture for series that focus on one particular element of a culture or place. Previous projects have documented the pipe organs of 20 German Catholic churches, observed the creative construction of Cambodia’s roadside barber shops, and captured abandoned storefronts that exist across Australia.

For the last few years Götzfried has focused on photographing the design of bowling alleys and “Kegelbahnen” across Southern Germany, most of which exist from the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s. Kegeln is a German sport similar to bowling, however with smaller balls, only nine pins, and shortened lanes. The sport has fallen from popularity, and many of the photographed lanes’ quality has diminished with the times. You can see a larger selection of Götzfried’s photographic projects on his websiteInstagram, and Behance. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

Should Architects Moonlight?

Moonlighting is something that literally ever architect has done at one time or another in their career. There are a handful of reasons why an architect would consider moonlighting, but I honestly believe the main reason (as in 99% of the reason) is financially based.

I have written about architects and moonlighting only once before on this site – a pretty ripe subject really, but considering this is article number 819, you could probably conclude that a) I don’t have strong feelings one way or the other, b) feel like this topic has so many variables to it that my myopic opinion on the subject isn’t worth discussing or c) I am too jaded to talk about this topic rationally.

The betting person would go with what’s behind door #3.

I do think this is a topic worth discussing and I am going to toss a few things out there for your consideration without getting into my jaded past. There are a lot of positive ramifications that come out of moonlighting work – the most obvious is money – so for the sake of time, let’s just assume that extra money is, for the most part, a good thing and let’s avoid that consideration for now. I do feel like I am in a somewhat unique position to talk about moonlighting because this site gives me such visibility that I receive emails from people from all skill and experience levels regaling me with tales of both their positive and negative experiences with moonlighting. To sum up, the short-term gains are always awesome and the long-term gains are rarely what that individual is hoping for.

Should Architects Moonlight

For the most part, I am not a fan of unsanctioned moonlighting but to put it simply, I don’t think there are any real positives other than financial short-term gains, and considering the potential pitfalls, even those can be dubious. Here are some of the main arguments I’ve heard supporting moonlighting:

I work in a large firm, how am I going to get project management experience doing toilet partition wall details?
Join an A.I.A. committee or donate some of your time to any of the number charities that could use an energetic future architect, get involved with Hearts and Hammers or Habitat for Humanity – the list can go on and on.

I am a super designer but no one here cares, I need to take on work so I can express myself and get my name out there!
While I am not a fan of competitions, you can always enter competitions if you want to introduce the world to its next greatest architect. The upside here is that if you are actually fortunate enough to place, you’ll some recognition, maybe some cash and if the grand prize winner, you’ll get your opportunity to actually create some real architecture.

My office doesn’t pay me enough to survive, I need to take on extra work to pay my bills.
Okay, I don’t have a great argument for this one. Even though my default answer is to tell you to go find somewhere else to work, that might make me appear inconsiderate to the working conditions wherever you are. I can’t help but think that if the firm where you work doesn’t value you enough to pay you your worth, what does it say about how you feel about your worth by staying? There is also the possibility that you aren’t worth what you think you are – either way, some additional research on your part should commence.

The people who want to hire me think I’m great and are willing to pay me what I’m charging.
That’s great … but I would ask if you are charging the correct amount. Most young energetic future architects will readily admit that they don’t understand billing and office management so it might seem like a fortune to get paid $35/hr for drawing up house plans. Do you understand or know how many hours you will have to spend preparing the drawings? What time from your friends and family you are forfeiting? What about taxes and social security or are you just not going to worry about that? Something in the neighborhood of $12.50 of your $35 should be going to Uncle Sam so you need to consider how important your gains are for $22.50/hr. Considering that a conservative estimate of 5% of the emails I receive are from people asking me how much they should charge for moonlighting work, I am comfortable claiming that most people don’t actually know what to charge.

Another consideration for those considering moonlighting work is to take a look at your client. Are they hiring you because they are your neighbor or your Aunt? Or are they hiring you to moonlight the project because they are looking for a lower cost provider? The latter will always make the worst client because they obviously don’t place a lot of value on your time or the services you provide. They might not have the financial resources suitable for the services they need (which essentially puts you at risk for not receiving what meager fees you are probably charging) otherwise, they would probably go a more traditional route of getting architectural services.

Okay … I might be wrong in that last paragraph. It is completely possible that the people asking for you to help them with a little moonlighting work are looking for some help and simply can’t afford to go a more traditional route by hiring a full-services architectural firm, but they actually do value the services you can provide. As a moonlighter, you might offer all the possible advantages of a full-service firm, but without the overhead of a more traditionally structured firm, and as a result, can charge a reduced amount for your service.

But do these clients realize that they will be receiving a reduced amount of your abilities? Let’s be honest, you can’t work on their project during regular business hours, the time during the day when you are supposed to be working on your “real” job. So you come home at night and start working on job #2 for the day. It is unlikely that you’ll be in top form and even more unlikely that the project will progress at the speed that it probably should. I suppose there are some trade-offs that the client would accept knowing that this is your working situation, although I can tell you that most clients seem to forget that you are moonlighting their job when push comes to shove, and they’ve grown tired of you trying to live your life while they are impatiently waiting on their addition/renovation drawings.

I personally don’t have any experience with that last paragraph, but I can look at the articles I write for this blog and tell you which ones have my attention and which ones don’t … which is the main reason I don’t charge people to read them.

You should also be aware that while architecture firms can’t technically be held for work that employees do on their own time, as with all legal matters, there’s the written policy and then there are the nuanced interpretations. If the work you plan on moonlighting is similar to the work you perform where you work, the work may be construed by the client (and the client’s attorney) as being produced under the supervision of the firm, thereby exposing your firm to liability by association for any of your negligent acts. If you use firm resources, like copiers, Fax’s, CAD equipment, advice from office peers, if you are in a decision-making position at your firm, and the firm doesn’t have a policy against moonlighting, your firm’s tacit approval of the use of these resources suggests that the firm benefits from and condones the moonlighting. With liability claims being what they are, principals at firms should think twice before allowing employees to use firm resources for any outside endeavors.

I can appreciate that anyone with the endurance to read this post might leave thinking I am bitter towards moonlighting, maybe because I took on one major moonlighting project in my youth and was completely hosed in the process. I do not encourage moonlighting in my office – they are busy enough with their real job and from what I know, we pay them what they’re worth (salary, provide insurance, healthcare, vision, dental, 401K, etc.). If they’ve got some spare time, we want them to volunteer and develop connections and obtain new skill sets that improve their value in the office. Finally, if someone in my office wants to work on a project for their Aunt or some friend of theirs, we let them bring it in, run point on the project, all while trying to protect them from making an unrecoverable mistake. However, if you work at a firm that specializes in tilt-wall warehouse buildings and you would like to tackle a different project type, I think the best course of action is to talk to your firm and let them know what you are trying to do. I can’t imagine that they would see this as a conflict of interest – who knows, maybe you’ll get the support that will allow you to put your best foot forward.

Moonlighting seems to be an inevitable rite of passage if you are an architect. My hope is that you are the architect that has positive results from the process, but 25 years of expeprience tells me that it isn’t going to work out the way you had hoped.

Best of luck,

Bob signature FAIA


This is the 28th entry in a series titled “ArchiTalks” and the topic was “Moonlighting”

When I started #ArchiTalks, I wanted people to discover that architects have different experiences, backgrounds, and objectives. Despite architects all getting lumped together with a handful of broad stereotypes, we are all onions … we have many layers and not all of them smell good.

If you would like to see how other architects from around the globe responded to today’s topic of “Moonlighting” just follow the links below.

Lee Calisti, AIA – Think Architect (@LeeCalisti)
moonlighting more than an 80s sitcom

Jeff Echols – Architect Of The Internet (@Jeff_Echols)
The Ironic Blasphemy of Moonlighting and what Architects are Missing Out On

Lora Teagarden – L² Design, LLC (@L2DesignLLC)
Moon(lighting) changes with the seasons

Collier Ward – One More Story (@BuildingContent)
Moonlighting

Jeremiah Russell, AIA – ROGUE Architecture (@rogue_architect)
hustle and grind: #architalks

Michael Riscica AIA – Young Architect (@YoungArchitxPDX)
Moonlighting for Young Architects

Stephen Ramos – BUILDINGS ARE COOL (@BuildingsRCool)
Architects do it All Night Long

Brian Paletz – The Emerging Architect (@bpaletz)
Starlight, moonlight – tick tock

Jeffrey Pelletier – Board & Vellum (@boardandvellum)
Is Moonlighting Worth It? Probably Not, But We All Try.

Kyu Young Kim – J&K Atelier (@sokokyu)
Dancing in the Moonlight

Keith Palma – Architect’s Trace (@cogitatedesign)
The Howling

Jim Mehaffey – Yeoman Architect (@jamesmehaffey)
Moonlighting: or Why I Kept My Dayjob.

Tim Ung – Journey of an Architect (@timothy_ung)
An Alternative to Moonlighting as a Young Architect

Mark Stephens (@architectmark)
Architalks 28 Moonlighting

Gabriela Baierle-Atwood (@gabrielabaierle)
On Moonlighting

Ilaria Marani – Creative Aptitude (@creaptitude)
There is no moolighting. It’s a jungle!

Jane Vorbrodt – Kuno Architecture (@janevorbrodt)
Crafted Moonlighting