Virginia cabin by 3north features fully glazed corner with river views

Glass panels on the corner of this residence pivot aside, opening the double-height living space to its waterfront site in Virginia.

<img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-1186831″ src=”https://static.dezeen.com/uploads/2018/02/contemporary-river-house-3north-architecture-virginia-usa_dezeen_2364_col_10.jpg” alt=”Contemporary River House by 3north” width=”2364″ height=”1576″>

Located in Matthews County, the simple Contemporary River House encompasses 800 square feet (75 square metres) and is positioned on sloping terrain leading down to the water.

“The objective was to create a streamlined, minimalist space that included an open living area, modestly sized master suite, and thoughtful storage options,” said 3north, a studio based in Richmond and with offices in San Francisco.

Contemporary River House by 3north

The home is reached via a long driveway, which leads to a parking courtyard framed by the house and an adjacent barn. “Here, the waterfront is deliberately obscured, creating a slow reveal that delivers its payoff inside, where a 17-foot (5.2-metre) glass wall frames a striking river view,” the firm said.

Contemporary River House by 3north

The ground floor is divided into a double-height kitchen, living and dining room on one side, and a bedroom and bathroom on the other. One corner is fully glazed, with pivoting doors at the base that allow the entertainment space to extend outdoors when open.

Contemporary River House by 3north

This area is covered by the broad roof that extends beyond the building’s external walls. “The porch is covered by the roof’s 16-foot (4.9-metre) overhang, which triples the home’s living space and facilitates entertaining,” said 3north.

Contemporary River House by 3north

A flight of metal stairs leads up to the master suite, which occupies the partial second floor, and has its own ensuite. A few steps away from the house, the architects located a swimming pool and a freestanding pool house. This contains separate guest quarters, providing visitors with more privacy.

Contemporary River House by 3north

Materials used inside follow the home’s minimalist aesthetic. White wooden planks clad the walls, matching the roof’s exposed structural joists. The architects chose concrete for the floors, while the natural wood of the kitchen cabinets provides contrast to the muted tones.

Contemporary River House by 3north

Black siding panels, laid horizontally, form the exterior cladding. “When viewed from the river, the black siding gives the impression that the house is receding into the landscape,” the team said.

 

Other homes in the state of Virginia include an almost entirely rebuilt waterfront home with a rooftop terrace by BFDO, and another waterfront property whose geometric copper roof is intended to withdstand intense storm winds.

Photography is by Keith Isaacs.

Project credits:

General contractor: Connemara Corporation
Structural engineer: Fox + Associates
PC cabinetry: Freeburger Custom Cabinetry
Stucco: James River Stucco
Painting: HJ Holtz & Son
Pool: Ultimate Pools

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Chongqing Tiandi Art Museum / Shenzhen Huahui Design


Night view. Image © Zhi Xia

Night view. Image © Zhi Xia
  • Architects: Shenzhen Huahui Design Co. Ltd
  • Location: Yuzhong, Chongqing, China
  • Architect In Charge: Cheng Xiao
  • Design Team: Shibo Yin, Qifan He, Weiwei Mao
  • Structural Designer: Mu Xu, Tingting Zhao
  • Client: Chongqing Vanke Real Estate Co., Ltd.
  • Area: 1600.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Zhi Xia, Weiwei Mao

© Zhi Xia

© Zhi Xia

Site
Tiandi Art Gallery is located in the south bank of Jialing River, close to the lake by Tiandi property. There are steep hills in Yuzhong peninsula in the south, Chongqing Tiandi Commercial Street in the north, and residential area under construction in the west.


Mountain lake and the building. Image © Zhi Xia

Mountain lake and the building. Image © Zhi Xia

Concept sketch

Concept sketch

Strategy
The starting point is how to merge the new building to a complex environment and make it become a part of the landscape, and how to form a dialogue between the interior space experience and the surroundings; we hope the building can be a container of different urban fragments and act as a sensory medium to experience the scenery.


© Zhi Xia

© Zhi Xia

Layout based on topography
The shape of the land follows with the belt-type lakeshore, which is relatively long and narrow. The building’s overall layout complied with the topography and was divided into three volumes based on different functions. The three volumes are linked together through a wing space, two of which form two half closed yards with the volume, one is connected with a pool to form a sunken yard, the other is linked with a square to hold small gathering activities for people in the park.


© Zhi Xia

© Zhi Xia

Axonometric drawing

Axonometric drawing

Spatial forms
Tiandi Art Gallery includes Art Display & Exhibition Hall, Vanke Brand & Project Experience Center and Café House.


Transparent landscape. Image © Zhi Xia

Transparent landscape. Image © Zhi Xia

The gallery frequently displays contemporary artworks by local artists, therefore, we designed a double-height space to display them. The staircases were utilized to connect different display platforms which are varied in height and can be used to exhibit paintings, sculptures and installation art, or provide art education for children. In this design, we used the contrast of white walls and black stairs to weaken the internal space form.


© Zhi Xia

© Zhi Xia

Art gallery

Art gallery

© Zhi Xia

© Zhi Xia

Moreover, we focused on the visiting path, through which the indoor and outdoor scenes were closely linked together and the scenery became a part of the exhibition. The platform on the top borrows scenery from the distant mountains, aiming to evoke a feeling of mountain climbing while walking around the museum, and the light reflected through the high windows attract visitors to climb up.


Entrance. Image © Zhi Xia

Entrance. Image © Zhi Xia

The Brand Display & Project Experience Center is a single-storey space used for the introduction of Vanke’s Tiandi property, in which we provided a wide scale according to the requirements of planning model display and negotiation. During the design process, we consciously lowered the height of the space by the lakeside, in order to avoid the uncontrollable vision and keep the sight inside the park.


Park inside. Image © Zhi Xia

Park inside. Image © Zhi Xia

Section

Section

The Café House was raised to the second floor to bring the waterscape inside. On the one hand, a slightly tilted volume is echoing with the geometric relation of the overall form, on the other hand, it is trying to endow a simple box with certain space gestures and expressions through a personalized action.


© Zhi Xia

© Zhi Xia

Walking scenery
Therefore, being combined with functional demands and environmental characteristics, the three volumes show different gestures, namely, being “high”, “wide” and “raised”. If the height is a simulation of mountain, then the staircases are allusions of “paths”, and the wide french window is a response to the water features. Furthermore, the sight-view windows which highlight the building create a city montage on the whole visiting line.


Island trees and the building. Image © Zhi Xia

Island trees and the building. Image © Zhi Xia

The three blocks are grouped together, and each has a different section view. The interior of the building does not emphasize its central feeling, however, with the “attraction” of objects and sceneries it creates interaction between visitors and the urban environment through the body’s movement, and translates environment features into spacetial experiences.


Circulation

Circulation

Transparent landscape. Image © Zhi Xia

Transparent landscape. Image © Zhi Xia

The exhibition and natural sceneries are connected through continuous paths, this concept has also been used in the landscape design. From the parking area, the culvert under the municipal road, lakeside plaza to the art platform, from the stairs, raised platform, floor windows, Café House to the glass corridor, all visitors are wandering inside the architecture as well as outside the space.


View from the road. Image © Zhi Xia

View from the road. Image © Zhi Xia

As we know, Le Corbusier praised highly the layout of Acropolis of Athens, in order to reproduce the spirit of place perceived by human behavior, his handling of space arrangement, hierarchical order and montage completed the connotation of free architecture, which is the core spirit he advocated in “Promenade Architecture”.

Changing means adapting

In her book devoted to the traditional architecture of different climate zones the architect and researcher Sandra Piesik asserts the need for a new holistic and multidisciplinary approach that is able to integrate the advantages of modernity with the solutions developed by humanity over millennia. Only in this way can we meet the challenges posed by nature

The post Changing means adapting appeared first on Abitare.

Take a Sneak Peek at SO–IL’s New Hong Kong Museum

SO-IL Hong Kong Museum

The CTF Museum is located within a KPF-designed development; the museum’s cylindrical glass facade distinguishes it from the rest of the building. The development is right on the Kowloon Bay waterfront; across the water is the Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre where Art Basel Hong Kong takes place. Courtesy SO – IL


For the Manetti Shrem Museum at UC Davis, Brooklyn-based firm SO–IL (working with Bohlin Cywinski Jackson) designed a sweeping 50,000-square-foot steel canopy that produces a dramatic play of light and shadow. The firm likes to play with envelopes, whether it’s a 510,000-ring chainmail skin or simple stretched fabric. But for a new art museum in Hong Kong, SO–IL is taking a familiar architectural material—glass—and bending it to its literal limits.

The museum, called CTF, is embedded within the sixth and seventh floors of a mixed-use development designed by New York firm KPF and owned by Hong Kong–based New World Development.

The developer’s executive vice-chairman Adrian Cheng has art world ambitions for the project. Cheng, the founder of K11 Art Foundation, a not-for-profit organization that promotes Chinese artists, initially commissioned SO–IL to design a flagship location for the foundation. However, the project expanded and evolved: the museum would be entirely separate from K11 (which owns no permanent collection) and would instead house the Cheng family’s extensive Western blue chip and Chinese Post-War art collections. The museum would also house exhibitions of borrowed artworks and exhibitions traveling from abroad.

“Hong Kong’s incredibly financially rich but not enough a cultural establishment,” says SO–IL principal Jing Liu. “There’s really no venue in Hong Kong that’s able to do [this] at this moment.”

SO-IL Hong Kong Museum

A rendering of the facade. The exterior-facing glass cylinders are fully enclosed and structural; they stand on their own and even support openings in the facade. Interior-only glass elements are only half-cylinders, as they don’t have to resist wind loads. Courtesy SO–IL


With the museum’s building already designed by KPF, SO–IL’s first major challenge was to distinguish the museum itself. “We said that we can’t just do an interior and put a museum in there; this is a very important project,” says Liu. “It needs to be a feature for Hong Kong. It needs to expand beyond its footprint to signal something.”

Even with the client onboard, building codes gave the firm a very narrow bandwidth. Moreover, Liu described how the facade needed “to have enough substance and create this separation from the everyday but also, expression-wise, [not] shy away from the everyday, which is all these commercial activities that are happening around it in this mixed-use, hyper-urban environment.”

The architects landed on glass but opted for something more monumental in lieu of a curtain wall. There are some 475 enclosed glass cylinders, each around 30 feet tall, that ring the museum. The facade will immediately stand out when viewed from afar: “It’s a horizontal sliver, but there is verticality to it. Because it’s glass, it creates this transparency that you typically don’t see on the facade of these buildings,” describes Liu. “The idea is [the building is] on display, you can see into it. [That’s] very much the expression we wanted to project out.”

The glass also helps the interior separate from the rest of the building. “When you’re walking close to it, you realize that transparency is something quite monumental. It kind of creates a new ground in that way.” Liu hopes that its appearance will help visitors “reset” when they arrive from the bustle below.

The 107,000-square-foot museum is divided by an open-air public plaza; galleries on its Eastern half are double-height and will house the larger artworks.

While the glass’s transparency is striking, it may be its acoustics that surprise the most in-person. Approaching a glass mock-up, “I felt my heart race a little bit because you feel the sound waves,” says Liu “When you’re a meter or a half-meter away from the glass, the soundscape completely changes.”

You may also enjoy “Qatar’s Msheireb Museums Pioneer a New Kind of Middle Eastern Cultural Architecture.”

Categories: Architecture, Cultural Architecture

The post Take a Sneak Peek at SO–IL’s New Hong Kong Museum appeared first on Metropolis.

A National Park-Inspired Chapel Composed of Branching Fractals by Yu Momeoda

Agri Chapel is located within a national park on the northwest coast of Japan’s island of Kyushu. The chapel was constructed by Japanese architect Yu Momoeda, who wanted to reflect the surrounding forest by bringing tree-like forms into the building.

To create the structure’s central dome, Momoeda stacked wooden pillars in the shape of simplistic tree branches. This nature-based support system imitates the branching fractals found in trees, with ascending symmetrical patterns spread throughout the light-filled space. (via Jeroen Apers)

Zaha Hadid’s Legacy and Her Top 10 Architectural Masterpieces

Zaha Hadid Architecture

Left: Sergey Khodakovskiy (www.hitartstudio.com) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5L-8S-PR7c) [CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons, Top Right: Interfase, Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons. Bottom Right: Torsade de Pointes (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
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Born in Baghdad and trained in London, legendary architect Zaha Hadid made an indelible mark on 21st-century architecture. Following the Postmodern architectural boom led by Frank Gehry, Hadid was one of a group of innovative architects who helped usher in a new age of architecture with a cross-pollination of technological and artistic influences.

Already recognized as a talent while studying at the Architectural Association School of Architecture—former professor Rem Koolhaas described her as “a planet in her own orbit”—her more than 30-year career helped shape the way society thinks about contemporary architecture. As a rare female in a male-dominated industry, and the first woman to win the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize, Hadid served as a beacon for creatives from different backgrounds, proving that you didn’t need to be a white male to make a statement in architecture.

Her untimely passing in 2016 left unfinished projects, many of which are now being brought to completion by Zaha Hadid Architects, the firm she began in 1980, just a few years after finishing her studies. Carrying on her work, we are able to see the physical realization of Hadid’s creative mind.

Not just limited to architecture, her work in interior design, fashion, industrial design (including yachts), and fine art reminds us of what a well-rounded artist she truly was. The scope and breadth of this creativity has left a lasting legacy that continues to influence creatives in all fields, even today.

Archives departementales Montpellier

Characteristics of Zaha Hadid Architecture

Known as the “queen of curves,” Zaha Hadid’s architecture isn’t easily grouped with one particular architectural style. It was a purposeful choice, as Hadid preferred not to limit her practice to a specific movement. She is well-known for her use of geometric shapes to create dynamic, fluid structures. Certainly, much of her influence stems from her love of abstract painting and drawing. It’s well-documented that she was particularly fond of avant-garde Russian painters such as Kazimir Malevich and even re-interpreted Vladimir Tatlin’s Monument to the Third International for an exhibition at the Guggenheim.

Supremacist Composition by Kazimir Malevich

‘Supremacist Composition’ (1916) by Kazimir Malevich [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

How do these abstract forms seep into her design process? “The whole idea of lightness, floating, structure and how it lands gently on the ground: It all comes from [the Russians],” she shared with the curator of her painting exhibition at the Serpentine Galleries. Still viewable online, taking in Zaha Hadid’s paintings is a key window into understanding her architecture.

Working particularly with concrete and glass, Hadid took these industrial materials and bent them into forms that subtly recall natural shapes. By deconstructing these forms, she was able to present cutting-edge work that also evokes human emotion.

Zaha Hadid Painting

Iconic Zaha Hadid Buildings

From 1994, when she completed the Vitra Fire Station, Zaha Hadid’s architectural output included museums, sports and cultural centers, commercial and residential buildings, as well as bridges and train stations. A look at some of her most iconic buildings.

Vitra Fire Station, Weil am Rhein, Germany (1993)

Vitra Fire Station

Fire Station | Vitra Campus - Weil am Rhein | Zaha Hadid

Built in a small German town on the borders of Switzerland and France, the Vitra Fire Station was Hadid’s first opportunity to bring her abstract drawings and paintings to life in a physical form. The sharp, angular concrete planes of the building are a glimpse into the future of Zaha Hadid’s architecture, with the project garnering her international acclaim.

 

MAXXI, Rome, Italy (1998–2010)

MAXXI

Zaha Hadid Buildings MAXXI Museum Rome

Photo: Commonurbock23 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Italy’s national art museum of contemporary art was a decade in the making, with the multi-faceted space moving forward slowly but surely despite government changing six times over the course of construction. The result is one of Hadid’s finest works, the building itself a monument fitting of standing alongside Rome’s colossal monuments. One of her most praised works, it won the 2010 Stirling Prize for Architecture, which goes to the best new European building built or designed in the UK.

 

Phaeno Science Center, Wolfsburg, Germany (2005)

Phaeno Science Center by Zaha Hadid

Photo: Richard Bartz (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

zaha hadid - phaeno science center-4

As the biggest investment the city had ever made, Wolfsburg’s new science center had a lot of riding on it. Hadid delivered with a stunning building that marries contemporary materials and forms into a timelessly classic building. The glass cutouts and ceiling latticework are recurring themes throughout Zaha Hadid’s buildings, with the concrete pillars creating “undulating artificial hills and valleys.”

 

Olympics Aquatics Centre, London, England (2005–2011)

The Aquatics Centre

Aquatics Centre, London

For the 2012 Summer Olympics, Hadid was charged with creating one of the major centers for the event. The resulting Aquatics Centre is a masterpiece with an undulating roof that rises up like a wave—a nod to Hadid’s inspiration. She looked to the forms of water in motion, making the natural shape with exposed concrete finishes. Though subsequently modified to transform the center into a space for public use, it remains one of the highlights of Olympic Park.

 

Sheikh Zayed Bridge, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (2007-10)

Sheikh Zayed Bridge by Zaha Hadid

Photo: Mohannad Khatib (Flickr: Sheikh Zayed Bridge – Abu Dhabi, UAE) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

sheikh zayed bridge

The two-way four-lane highway bridge is a stunning look at how Hadid’s curving forms translate to functional architecture. The undulating bridge, which connects Abu Dhabi island to the southern Gulf shore, was inspired by the forms of sand dunes, once again showing how Hadid’s architecture takes inspiration from nature. Stretching a half-mile (842 meters), it’s said to be one of the most complex bridges ever constructed.

The post Zaha Hadid’s Legacy and Her Top 10 Architectural Masterpieces appeared first on My Modern Met.

Pompejus Theater in Halstere

Pompejus Theater, West Brabant Open-Air Entertainment Venue, Design Holland, Architect, Images

Pompejus Theater in Halstere

Open-Air Entertainment Venue in The Netherlands – design by Architect: RO&AD Architecten

19 Feb 2018

Pompejus Theater

Design: RO&AD Architecten

Location: Halsteren, The Netherlands 

Pompejus Theater

Pompejus Theater

Pompejus is a watchtower on Fort de Roovere in Halsteren, West Brabant. The tower looks out over the West Brabant Water Defence Line, the oldest part of the Zuiderwaterlinie running from Bergen op Zoom to Grave. Pompejus is a watchtower, an open-air theatre and an information point for tourists. Pompejus is named after the first commander of the fortress, Pompejus de Roovere

Pompejus Theater

The West Brabantse Water Defence Line was built in 1627 by the States of Zeeland, and Zuid-Holland to protect the important shipping route from Middelburg to Dordrecht against attacks by the Spaniards and the French. The line included the cities of Bergen on Zoom and Steenbergen and a number of forts, including the main fort, Fort de Roovere and was the first landscape defensive work in which inundation was deployed as a defence strategy.

Pompejus Theater

Inundation is the submersion of the landscape so that armies can no longer pull through the landscape with their equipment. In the course of the centuries the Linie has been under fire several times, among other things against the Austrians, French and Spanish.

Pompejus Theater

In the beginning of the 18th century the water line became more and more important and was thoroughly strengthened by the famous fortress builder Menno van Coehoorn. Fortress the Roovere was reinforced and increased and several preliminary works were carried out. The West Brabantse Waterlinie is the only waterline in the Netherlands where ever has been battled, usually successful, sometimes not. In 1747 the line and the City fell under the siege of the French. In the 19th century the line was strategically depreciated. It disappeared in some places, in others the forts were excavated. From 2010 onwards, one has started restoring the line. Forests have been taken from the forts, canals are restored. From that time on, the line is also developed for recreation

Pompejus Theater

Pompejus Theater

Landscape
The line uses very subtle altitude differences in the landscape. This is possible because it is located on the edge of the Brabantse Wal, the edge of the deck sand in Brabant. The low parts can be inundated, on the high parts and therefore defensive weak parts fortified towns and forts were built. These fortresses are sand forts and were connected to each other with ‘Linie dikes’. But also visually the forts were connected, you could look from one fortress to another. By afforestation this is no longer possible. Fort the Roovere was a central point in the landscape.

Pompejus Theater

The separation of fresh water and salt water inundation was here. It was the middle of the defence line, so from the fortress towards Bergen op Zoom and in the direction of Steenbergen could be looked at. This is no longer possible in the current landscape, which is why the plan came up of creating a watchtower here to make that possible again.

Pompejus Theater

Design
The edge of the fortress on which Pompejus stands is directed at the enemy. The tower is positioned exactly on that corner. By mirroring up the sides of the fort, a sharp shape is created which leans forward over the moat. As a result, it is closed on the outside, and open at the fort side. This creates space on the inside for an information centre and an open-air theatre for 225 people.

Pompejus Theater

To see the surrounding area over the trees, the tower must be 25 meters high above the fortress. Because the fortress itself rises 9 metres above the landscape, Pompejus literally towers 34 metres above his surroundings. From the top you can look 20 kilometres far in all directions and you can see the entire West Brabant Water Defence Line. The facade is designed according to the principle of the Voronoi diagram, a mathematical design principle in which we used the triangles of the steel construction in order to make it possible to have windows and openings in the façade. Secondly the facade can be divided into elements to be prefabricated and transported, and add an additional layer to the facade to break the dominance of the triangular steel structure.

Pompejus Theater

Technology and material
In order to make the building of Pompejus manageable for everyone, we have used the File-to-Factory principle. No drawings have been made for the construction, only a 3D model is used. This model has been directly converted into ‘scripts’ for a Tekla model for the steel manufacturer and in machine language for CNC milling machines of the carpentry factory. This resulted in kind of Ikea-Billy cabinet packs in which all of the produced elements were encoded and could be assembled relatively easily.

Pompejus Theater Pompejus Theater

These packages were also scripted in such a way that from the 3D model also automatically the assembly drawings were provided. The construction consists of a hybrid steel-wood construction, in which the main structure consists of galvanized steel, and the sub-structure, façade elements, stairways and stairs are made of timber. The wood used is Accoya. The information space is thermally isolated and consists of timber frame construction.

Pompejus Theater Pompejus Theater

Social system
In order to make this project possible, a community has grown in Bergen op Zoom who participated in the creation of Pompejus. For example, crowdfunding has been used to let people sponsor Pompejus, companies have sponsored parts of construction such as transport or wood, schools have provided interns, but also organizations have provided interns and volunteers. People who want to use the Pompejus and fort the Roovere in the future have been active to help the development. The aim was to make Pompejus ‘our tower’ and to connect with the residents of the surrounding area. This has been successful not only because the tower has been built, but above all because there is already an entire organisation to program the fort with events and it will be properly programmed and managed in the coming years.

Pompejus Theater

Pompejus Theater, Halstere – Building Information

Architect: RO&AD Architecten, Bergen op Zoom 
Design team: Ad Kil, Ro Koster, Martin van Overveld 
Commissioner: Municipality Bergen op  Zoom 
structural engineer: Adviesbureau Luning, Velp
Contractors: Berghbouw, De Kok Bouwgroep, Nijs Soffers, VKP 
Location: Halsteren, The Netherlands 
Start-End construction: 02-2017, 12-2017 
Function: info-centrum / Watch tower,  open air theatre, info centre 
Height: 26 meter 

Pompejus Theater

Photography: Katja Effting 

Pompejus Theater in Halstere images and text by RO&AD Architecten

To see all listed projects on a single map please follow this link.


Dutch Architecture

Dutch Architecture

Landscape Architecture in The Netherlands

Biesbosch Museum Island Renovation and Extension, Werkendam
Design: Studio Marco Vermeulen
Biesbosch Museum
photograph : Ronald Tilleman

Biesbosch Museum Island

Sculptural Staircase, Rotterdam, Carnisselande, Barendrecht
Design: NEXT architects
Sculptural Staircase 1
photograph : Sander Meisner

Sculptural Staircase Rotterdam

Contemporary Bridges


Contemporary Dutch Architecture

EEA and Tax offices, Groningen
Design: UNStudio, architects
EEA Groningen Building
photo : Ronald Tilleman

IBG and Tax Offices

Almere Masterplan
Design: Rem Koolhaas, architect
Almere Masterplan
image courtesy of the Office for Metropolitan Architecture

Almere Masterplan

Borneo Sporenburg : Houses
Design: various architects incl. MVRDV
Borneo Amsterdam
picture © Adrian Welch

Borneo Houses

Website : Holland

Bridge DesignsBridge Designs

Dutch Buildings

Comments / photos for this Pompejus Theater in Halstere page welcome

Pompejus Theater in Halstere – page

Website: RO&AD Architecten

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