Tesla’s new “workplace charging” program would corner office parking spots

Enlarge (credit: Tesla)

Tesla has long required buyers to install a brand-specific adapter in their homes to charge their cars. Now the company wants to help workplaces do the same so that people without access to a garage at night can find 6 to 8 hours of charging on the other end of the clock. On Thursday, Tesla announced that it would work with building managers to install free charging infrastructure—the building would only have to pay for the cost of the electricity.

Tesla already has a similar destination charging program, where hotels and restaurants can have a Tesla charger installed, and the property owner covers electricity cost. One important note about these workplace chargers, however, is that their location won’t be made public, so tenants of the building are the primary beneficiaries.

It obviously benefits Tesla to bring potential customers without a garage at home into the fold. If workplace charging can replace garage charging, the electric vehicle (EV) company can make its pitch to more people. But though it sounds very altruistic, Tesla would certainly be getting something out of any “workplace charging” agreement. As autonomous vehicle law consulting firm Safe Self Drive tweeted, installing Tesla charging spots in crowded urban areas amounts to building Tesla-reserved parking spots. (That is, unless you have access to one of the few adapters out there that let non-Tesla EVs draw from Tesla chargers.) From a building manager’s perspective, it’s probably better to install a generic EV charger and let Tesla owners use their adapters to fill up the tank.

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Quirky Illustrations by Virginia Mori Blend Melancholy and Surreal Humor

Using simple line drawings and pared down images, Virginia Mori captures complex human emotions. Though many of Mori’s illustrations lean toward the melancholy with themes of isolation and anxiety, moments of levity and escapism can be found, especially in her works that feature books. Mori’s artworks tend to feature just one person, often a young female protagonist, or a few people who aren’t quite interacting.

The artist lives and works in Italy, and in addition to her pencil and pen drawings, she also is an animator. Recently, Mori’s illustrations were the inspiration for a photo series with the fashion brand Gucci. You can see more of her work on her website, as well as Instagram and Facebook. (via Colossal Submissions)

15+ Quirky Gifts Perfect for People Who Love Painting

Gifts for People Who Love Paintings Mini Easel Painting Accessories Paint Splatter

This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase, My Modern Met may earn an affiliate commission. Please read our disclosure for more info.

Characterized by colorful compositions, energetic brushstrokes, and a wide range of visual styles, painting is one of the most beloved and popular forms of art. While not everyone can create an acrylic or oil masterpiece, everyone can enjoy the timeless practice with these products for people who love paintings.

Transcending the traditional canvas, this selection features everything from colorful and contemporary home decor to stylish statement jewelry. Some gifts—like the palette-inspired pendant and cookies—showcase a love for the painting process. Others—like the tiny Van Gogh figurine and the Monet-inspired paper flowers—convey an interest in art history. And some—including the pillow splattered in paint and the splashy clock—simply celebrate the beauty of brushwork.

Whether you’re an artist, museum-goer, or simply a lover of color, these products are sure to please your painterly side!

Check out our selection of gifts for people who love paintings!

Framed ‘Starry Night‘ Necklace

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Looking for more products for the creative people in your life? Be sure to check out our selection of gifts for artists!

Related Articles:

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13 Best Watercolor Paint Sets Both Beginners and Professional Artists Will Love

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Architect Couple Turns Cardboard Boxes Into Stackable Cat Fort

We all know that cats love cardboard boxes. This Taiwanese brand called Cat Thing took them to another level by creating a collection with a modern design, where a modular docking system allows to build an awesome city to be set up for felines.

There are numerous mounting options and four customizable “environments”, consisting of bedroom, living room, balcony and ramp. With a minimalist look, the boxes can be stacked to result in a small building and have openings in the most varied geometric shapes, where cats can jump and observe the surroundings.

The material is completely recyclable and made with non-toxic substances to cats. And you do not have to use any tool to build your cat’s city – Cat Thing already comes with fittings.

More info: A Cat Thing (h/t: boredpanda)













The post Architect Couple Turns Cardboard Boxes Into Stackable Cat Fort appeared first on Design You Trust.

10 Portrait Projects to Build Skills and Creativity

Artists throughout time have been fascinated with capturing the visual imagery of the people who surround them. In a sense, portraiture documents our history. Like other artists, I have found my students are genuinely interested in learning the techniques needed to master drawing the face.

I have also found when the art of portraiture is consistently taught across grade levels, students understand it much better. Allowing students to repeatedly see how the face is made up of line, shape, and value takes student work to the next level.

Once students have learned and practiced the basics, it’s all about finding the right creative prompt to help them tell their visual stories. I am excited to share this list of ideas with you!

Below you will find ten lessons complete with Objectives, Materials, and Procedures. I’ve also noted for which grade levels these are best suited. That said, these are versatile lessons! All of them can be scaled up or down depending on the age level you teach.


I recently shared this information at the Winter 2018 Art Ed Now Conference. It was an amazing day filled with inspiring presenters! Registration for the Summer Conference is now open. I’ll be presenting on Art with Purpose and would love to see you there! See what other presentations have already been released and learn more right here.


10 Portrait-Inspired Lessons for All Ages

various student portraits
“Hokey Hat,” “Partner Portrait Contour Study,” and “Pin-spiration Portrait” student examples

1. Hokey Hats

Best suited for grades K-3

Objectives

In this project, students will view and discuss hats from various time periods. They will observe and be inspired by the decorations and patterns they see. Students will use various media and techniques to create a mixed media piece.

Materials

  • Black permanent markers
  • Crayons
  • Markers
  • 8.5″ x 8/5″ white paper
  • Visuals of hats
  • Construction paper
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Construction paper crayons
  • Tempera paint
  • Sponges

Procedures

  1. Ask students to think about how they look.
  2. View and discuss samples of hats from various time periods to see how they have changed. Ask students to think about what hats may tell about their wearers.
  3. Have students draw their portraits.
  4. Demonstrate how to draw different types of hats and how to decorate with a pattern.
  5. Have students create their own hats from construction paper to add to their portraits.
  6. Encourage students to decorate their hats with a pattern.

Extension

To add even more visual interest to these pieces, students could stamp a patterned border with tempera paint or draw a patterned border with construction paper crayons.


2. All About Me, Picture Perfect Self-Portraits

tile wall

Best suited for grades K-5

Objectives

In this lesson, students will think about who they are and learn how to create proportionally accurate portraits. Students will learn how to work with crayons to blend their own unique skin tones and how to paint with markers.

Materials

  • Black permanent markers
  • Crayons
  • Markers
  • 8 ½ “ x 8 ½ “ white paper
  • Portrait examples
  • Mirrors

Procedure

  1. Ask students to think about how they look. Then, have them look at themselves in a mirror to see if their perceptions match their reality.
  2. Show students examples of portraits from different times in art history and discuss the proportions of the facial features.
  3. Teach students how to use their fingers as rulers to measure the different parts of their faces and discuss how they relate to one another. For example, the length of the eye matches the height of the nose, and the length of the mouth matches the height of the ear.
  4. Demonstrate how to draw different facial features, including hair.
  5. Have students draw their faces using everything they’ve learned.
  6. Have students add a horizon line to create the illusion of background and foreground.
  7. Teach students how to layer crayons to create their own skin tones.
  8. Have students add color to their drawing by using crayon for the portrait and marker for the background. If using water-based markers, students can “paint” with them.

Extension

Consider using this lesson as a fundraiser. Families love self-portraits! You could even get each student’s portrait put on a ceramic tile to create a school-wide installation.


3. Mona MEsas

student artwork

Best suited for grades K-5

Objectives

In this lesson, students will learn about Leonardo da Vinci and learn to create proportionately accurate portraits. In addition, students will experiment with various mediums to create a mixed media artwork.

Materials

  • Thin Sharpies
  • Crayons
  • Markers
  • Oil pastels
  • Mona Lisa print for reference
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Construction paper
  • 8 ½ “ x 11″ white paper
  • Copies of the Mona Lisa with the face erased

Procedure

  1. Ask students to think about how they look.
  2. Introduce students to the Mona Lisa. (If you’re feeling bold, try dressing up like her. It’s always a huge hit and something the students will never forget!)
  3. Give students a copy of the Mona Lisa with the face erased. Instruct them to draw their own faces where hers was. (Get it? Mona MEsa!) If you haven’t already, make sure you demonstrate how to draw facial features in proportion.
  4. Then, have the students trace over the rest of the copy with a Sharpie marker, effectively creating a contour line study of the Mona Lisa.
  5. Have students create a background that has personal meaning to them. It’s a good idea to instruct students to add a horizon line at this point to help them create foreground.
  6. Students can add color to their pieces using markers, crayons, colored pencil, or oil pastels.
  7. Finally, have students glue their completed self-portrait to a piece of construction paper to give it heft and a finished look.

Extension

To take this lesson a step further, have students add a transparency over their first drawing. Using permanent markers or oil pastels, have them create a second “look” and background for their portrait. Attaching the transparency on top of the first creates a fun flippable effect!


4. Finster’s Folk Art Faces

student artwork

Best suited for grades 3-6

Objectives

This project uses folk artist, Howard Finster, as inspiration. Students will tell a personal story through their artwork and mix paints to create their unique skin tones.

Materials

  • Images of Finster’s work for reference
  • 12″ x 18″ white drawing paper
  • Pencils
  • Black permanent markers
  • Markers
  • Tempera or acrylic paint
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Construction paper

Procedure

  1. Have students view and discuss Finster’s work, concentrating on his self-portraits.
  2. Have students draw their faces in pencil and trace with a black permanent marker.
  3. Have students mix their skin tone and paint their face and neck. Then, have students fill in the rest of their piece using markers.
  4. Once the paint is completely dry, have students re-trace their lines with the black permanent markers.
  5. Have each student write a story about themselves and transfer it directly onto their portrait using pencil. This step will make the portraits mimic Finster’s storytelling pieces.
  6. Finally, have students cut out their faces leaving a half-inch border and mat them on construction paper.

5. Michelangelo-Inspired Self-Portraits

student artwork

Best suited for grades 3-6

Objectives

In this project, students will learn about the art of the early Renaissance artists, specifically Michelangelo. Students will learn about the Sistine Chapel, frescos, and panel art. Students will get to feel what it might’ve been like to draw on the ceiling by drawing under their tables. Finally, students will learn about color layering.

Materials

  • 9” x 12” heavy white paper
  • Prismacolor Art Stix or colored pencils
  • 12” x 18” construction paper
  • Scissors
  • Tape
  • Digital photo of each student (printed out)
  • Images of the Sistine Chapel for inspiration

Procedures

  1. Have students look at and discuss examples of different types of angel paintings created during the Renaissance, including those of the Sistine Chapel.
  2. Discuss how Michelangelo created the work of the Sistine Chapel.
  3. Have students tape their papers under their tables and sketch out their angel shapes while lying on their backs, propped up on their elbows. After sketching, have students switch to sitting in their regular seats for the remainder of the project.
  4. Have students cut out the digital image of their face and glue it to their angel sketch. Then, have students color their faces using Prismacolor Art Stix or colored pencils.
  5. Have students add color to the remainder of their angels and backgrounds using the media of their choice.
  6. Try hanging these on the ceiling to complete the effect!

Extension

To turn these into triptych-inspired panels, have students glue their angels to construction paper and fold the sides. Then, have them complete the side panels using imagery and text.


6. Honesty Hands: Who Am I?

student artwork

Best suited for grades 4-8

Objectives

This lesson eases students into the idea of self-portraits. Students will learn how to tell a viewer about themselves without drawing their face and to give their art more personal meaning. Students will also learn about color selection and blending techniques.

Materials

  • 9″ x 12″ white drawing paper
  • Pencils
  • Black permanent fine tip markers
  • Markers
  • Oil pastels
  • Feathers
  • Visuals of painted Ndebele for inspiration

Procedures

  1. Briefly discuss the art of portraiture with students. Explain that instead of drawing their faces, students will explore the idea of portraiture through symbols and colors.
  2. Talk about how each person’s hand tells a personal story of who they are.
  3. Have students trace their hand with a pencil onto their paper and talk about contour line.
  4. Have students trace their hand outline with the black permanent marker and then create a meaningful line design inside the hand.
  5. Have students color in the different sections they create with markers. Then, have them add embellishments with oil pastels.
  6. To fill in the background, discuss warm and cool colors and have students choose one or the other with which to work. Have students go around the hand and around the border of the paper. Then, have them blend the colors inward to create a glowing effect.
  7. Finally, students will write a story, in pencil, about who they are as individuals around the hand, giving the art more personal meaning.

Extension

You can have students add some three-dimensional embellishments like feathers, beads, or small pieces made of model magic to take this a step further.


7. Pop Art Portraits

student artwork

Best suited for grades 4-9

Objectives

In this project, students will learn about Pop Art and the art of digital photography. Students will create mixed media pieces.

Materials

  • 9″ x 9″ heavy white paper
  • Black permanent markers
  • Markers
  • Oil pastels
  • Prismacolor Art Stix or colored pencils
  • Digital cameras
  • Color or black and white printer
  • Digital images of each student
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Pop Art images for inspiration

Procedures

  1. Have students view examples of several Pop artists, focusing on the work of Andy Warhol. Discuss the idea of repetition present in the work and how that relates to digital photography.
  2. Have students look in a mirror and discuss what they see.
  3. Have students partner up and take digital photos of each other. Before the next class, print each student’s photo.
  4. Have students use the photograph to draw what they see, leaving space on the paper to glue the original photo down.
  5. Have students color in their digital image using the Prismacolor Art Stix or colored pencils. Show students how to layer different colors to achieve their unique skin tones and remind them they will need different values, so their faces don’t look flat.
  6. Have students cut out their colored digital images and glue them onto their papers next to their drawings.
  7. Have students color in their drawn self-portraits in the same way.
  8. Finally, have students create a background for their piece by using black permanent marker to draw and then markers and/or oil pastels to finish.

Extension

Instead of just using Pop Art as inspiration, try mixing two styles together. American Modernism works well. With the two portraits side-by-side, Grant Wood’s American Gothic is a natural fit.

At the end of the project, have students walk around the room to view everyone’s work. Have each student choose one piece to write a quick narrative story about, making sure to use the vocabulary learned in the lesson.


8. 2 Contour Line Studies: “Hand Studies” and “Partner Portraits”

Photo 8

Best suited for grades 7-9

Objective

Students will understand the importance of contour line. They will practice blind contour, partial blind contour, and contour line techniques.

Materials

Hand Studies

  • 12” x 18” black construction paper
  • Pencils
  • Glue
  • Chalk pastels

Partner Portraits

  • 12” x 18” white drawing paper
  • Pencils
  • Black permanent markers
  • Crayons
  • Markers

Procedures

Hand Studies

  1. Introduce the importance of line in art. Pose the question, “Do you think this is the most important element? Why or why not?” and discuss.
  2. Discuss the term contour line and view artwork that uses contour line.
  3. Have students create ten sketches of their hands in their sketchbooks and choose one to recreate on a larger scale.
  4. Have students draw their hand on the black paper with pencil and trace the pencil lines with glue.
  5. When dry, have students fill the resulting spaces with chalk pastel.

Partner Portraits

  1. Have students do some contour studies in their sketchbooks using their classmates as subjects. Before starting, demo drawing a face in contour line. (I always mention a bug following the lines very slowly as I model this technique.)
  2. Have students move to the large paper and draw a “partner portrait” of someone else in the class. Encourage students to use contour lines in the negative space as well.
  3. Have students trace their pencil lines with both thin and thick black permanent markers paying attention to the line quality needed to show variety.
  4. Have students add color with both markers and crayons, being sure to keep the colors separated by the newly formed shapes.

Extension

Have students create a display of these two projects together for the hallway to teach others about contour line!


9. Portrait Project

student work

Best suited for grades 9-12

Objective

Through this project, students will experience the difference between drawing from life and drawing from a photograph. Students will use line, shape, and value to create a proportionally accurate portrait. Students will compare and contrast their two drawings and discuss the differences.

Materials

  • 12” x 18” white drawing paper
  • Pencils
  • Mirrors
  • Black and white high-contrast photographs

Procedures

  1. Instruct students to fold their paper in half.
  2. Have students look in a mirror and begin to draw what they see on half of their 12” x 18” white drawing paper. Remind them to measure with their fingers, using the eye as the constant and to observe closely so they can draw what they actually see.
  3. After two to three class periods of drawing from a mirror, have students turn their paper over and begin to draw from a high contrast photograph of their face on the other side.
  4. Again, remind students to use line, shape, and value and to observe closely and draw what they see.
  5. Over the next few class periods, have students go back and forth between the direct observation study and photograph study, comparing and contrasting as they go.
  6. When finished, have students critique and discuss the two portraits and drawing techniques.

10. PIN-spiration Portraits

student work

Best suited for grades 9-12

Objective

In this final project, students will learn how important it is for artists to become researchers. Students will learn to use Pinterest boards for inspiration by combining the styles of three artists or techniques to create their own work.

Materials

  • Access to Pinterest
  • Mixed media

Procedures

  1. Explain that one way artists can be inspired is by looking at the work of others. Show students one way to organize this type of inspiration is through a Pinterest board.
  2. Throughout the semester, have students pin a minimum of ten artworks per day. Don’t be surprised if they pin many more!
  3. When it’s time to start the project, have students choose three of their favorite pinned works to use as inspiration.
  4. Give students complete freedom to use any size surface, any and all media, and to explore the art process and the tools they have been taught to create a final piece of WOW art.

This lesson is a wonderful way to prepare students who may take an AP Art course. It challenges them to make their own artistic decisions.

I hope you can use these lessons with your students to help them better understand the art of portraiture while celebrating their beauty and creativity! Enjoy!

How are you teaching your students about the art of portraiture?

Do you think it’s important to teach portraiture at every grade level?

The post 10 Portrait Projects to Build Skills and Creativity appeared first on The Art of Ed.

In Focus: The Van Dyck portrait that shows Charles I as monarch, connoisseur and proud father

Lilias Wigan takes a detailed look at Van Dyck’s The Greate Peece, one of the highlights of the Royal Academy’s stunning exhibition of the art collected by Charles I.

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Charles I and Henrietta Maria with Prince Charles and Princess Mary (‘The Greate Peece’), 1632 Oil on canvas, 303.8 x 256.5 cm RCIN 405353 Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018 Exhibition organised in partnership with Royal Collection Trust
Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Charles I and Henrietta Maria with Prince Charles and Princess Mary (‘The Greate Peece’) – Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018
Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Charles I and Henrietta Maria with Prince Charles and Princess Mary (‘The Greate Peece’), 1632 Oil on canvas, 303.8 x 256.5 cm RCIN 405353 Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018 Exhibition organised in partnership with Royal Collection Trust

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Charles I and Henrietta Maria with Prince Charles and Princess Mary (‘The Greate Peece’). Oil on canvas, 303.8 x 256.5 cm. Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018

The Royal Academy has launched ints 250th anniversary celebrations with a milestone exhibition: Charles I: King and Collector, which runs until 15 April. It reunites many of the magnificent works of art that Charles I and his Queen, Henrietta Maria of France, amassed during his reign. Oliver Cromwell subsequently sold off around 2,000 artworks, following the King’s execution in 1649, to raise funds for his new army and to pay off Charles’s debts.

Charles II retrieved what he could following the Restoration but much of what was once Britain’s most important collection of art is now dispersed across the globe, forming the highlights of key museums all over the world. The Royal Academy has secured some impressive loans, including Titian’s The Emperor Charles V with a Dog, (Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid); Titian’s Supper at Emmaus and his Conjugal Allegory, (Musée du Louvre, Paris) as well as four Mortlake Tapestries designed from cartoons by Raphael and an array of other impressive works from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, the National Gallery of Art, Washington and the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. A jubilant rehanging of Mantegna’s monumental nine-part sequence, The Triumph of Caesar (usually at Hampton Court), occupies the largest of the galleries.

The piece we’re looking at here, however, comes from rather closer to home, having been among the paintings restored to the Royal collection.

By the time Anthony Van Dyck was appointed Court Painter to Charles I, in 1632, the King’s reputation as an art collector and patron was already widely recognised across Europe. Charles I and Henrietta Maria with Prince Charles and Princess Mary (‘The Great Peece‘) of 1632 was Van Dyck’s first major commission and showcases his skilful propaganda.

Charles I, who had rickets as a child, appears to have overcome his physical infirmity. He is depicted in this painting as having natural dynastic charm and regal power.

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Charles I and Henrietta Maria with Prince Charles and Princess Mary (‘The Greate Peece’), 1632 Oil on canvas, 303.8 x 256.5 cm RCIN 405353 Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018 Exhibition organised in partnership with Royal Collection Trust

Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018

Framed in front of a monumental column (a technique Van Dyck borrowed directly from Titian), his position as monarch is strengthened.

Henrietta Maria looks at him lovingly as he confronts us with a steady gaze. Parliament is silhouetted in the background, reinforcing the idea of his power over Westminster.

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Charles I and Henrietta Maria with Prince Charles and Princess Mary (‘The Greate Peece’), 1632 Oil on canvas, 303.8 x 256.5 cm RCIN 405353 Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018 Exhibition organised in partnership with Royal Collection Trust

Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018

The crown, orb and sceptre by his heir’s head emphasise the dynasty, but there remains an informal tenderness to the portrait — in, for example, the way the son touches his father’s knee. Tiny dogs scamper at their feet. The piece has the dual function of being both an official state portrait and a royal conversation piece

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Charles I and Henrietta Maria with Prince Charles and Princess Mary (‘The Greate Peece’), 1632 Oil on canvas, 303.8 x 256.5 cm RCIN 405353 Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018 Exhibition organised in partnership with Royal Collection Trust

Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018

Art for Charles I was a means of gaining regal publicity. In the sheer breadth of his tastes and the exceptional quality of the pictures in this exhibition, there is a pervading, tangible recognition that it was also, ultimately, his passion.



 

I Immortalize My Travel Experiences By Cutting Them From Paper

I really love to travel, explore new cultures and discover new places. But more than traveling I love art. So whenever and wherever I go art helps me to capture and memorize traveling moments.

Here are my recent works that I made during my visit to India. Hope you will enjoy them!

More info: Instagram

Taj Mahal

Mahatma Ghandi

Life of Pi

Moana and Maui

Astana vs Goa: when winter meets summer

Ariel

Whale

Aladdin and Jasmin

An Experimental Short Film Captures the Dramatic Dance of the Seasons



French film director Thomas Blanchard (previously) is known for his video work with oils and inks. In his most recent video, DANCE DANCE, Blanchard uses flowers as the contextual framework for his signature coils and swirls of color. Flowers have long been used as symbols of vitality and mortality, and the fire and ice these blooms are subjected to suggests a literal interpretation of those concepts. In the dramatically scored video, flowers and foliage light on fire, freeze and melt in icy pools, and are consumed by billowing clouds of colorful smoke. You can see more of Blanchard’s work on Vimeo, Behance, and Facebook. (via We and the Color)